Glibc is one of the newest bugs on the market that is affecting computers, apps, and devices that are all connected to the Internet. This new bug was found by Google security researchers. The actual bug is a flaw in the code, allowing it to affect those who are using devices that could be affected.

glibc getaddrinfo stack-based buffer overflowWho is Affected with Glibc?

The expanse of Glibc is not truly known yet. However, there are several devices that could be affected. The main vulnerability is those devices that are running the Linux operating system. This means that surveillance cameras, servers, internet capable devices and wireless routes could all be affected. In addition, those smart washers on the market running the Linux system could be affected as well. According to Seven Murdoch, a security researcher at UCL:

“SOMETIMES BABY CAMERAS RUN LINUX AS WELL, AND THEY’RE SOMETIMES CONNECTED TO THE INTERNET. THERE HAS BEEN CONCERN THAT THESE HAD SECURITY VULNERABILITIES THAT WOULD ALLOW PEOPLE TO ACCESS THEM. THIS IS ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF THOSE VULNERABILITIES.”

Basically, any type of device or platform built using the Python, PHO or Ruby on Rails programming could be affected. Services that could be affected are numerous. But, just a few examples include Dropbox, Facebook, and Twitter. The good news is that those who are using Windows or OS X are not affected.

Fighting Back

The Glibc bug has been acknowledged, and patches have been dispensed to help deal with this security threat. This does mean that in order to protect yourself, you are going to want to ensure that you are downloaded all the security updates for the device that you are using. What is surprising many people is that Google researchers are finding that people were aware of this bug in July of 2015, yet it is just now becoming a cause for concern.

Google also discovered that this flaw has been seen in code that is dating back to 2008. It is more important than ever that people are updating their devices with the latest security updates. Otherwise, they do run the risk of becoming infected with this bug.

Joel Timothy is a writer who has a passion for tech and internet security and privacy.

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